Happy Christmas: Musical Reflections 7–For the One with little…

Little Baby, I am a poor boy too

I have no gift to bring that’s fit to give our king

Humility is a quality modeled to us in Jesus.

In His birth.

In His life.

In His sacrifice for us on the cross.

He didn’t consider equality with God something to grasp (Phil 2:6).

He chose, instead, to consider us and our well-being more than the glory He deserved.

Humility, the definition is a modest or low view of one’s own importance.

This little drummer boy, and his words also reflect the humility inherent in our King.

I wonder if Christ’s humility enabled the courage of this young drummer to approach Him?

Perhaps because of Christ being a baby, He felt ‘One’ with our Savior in a way He would not have if Christ had been the valiant warrior that His people expected.

Because of Christ’s humility, perhaps the people on the fringes had more access to Him.

Shall I play for you?

This is maybe my favorite line of the whole song.

This is so brave.

Do you ever have those inklings?

Those internal twitches towards action…

Should I do ______.

Should I try ______.

My anxious brain almost immediately begins to count the cost.

I begin to weigh the risks and anticipate potential humiliation.

I begin to shrink a bit and hesitate.

But this little drummer boy—He asked the ever-important question.

Though I don’t have a ‘gift’ of grandness or monetary worth,

I could offer myself—the way God made me—the gifts He gave me.

I played my drum for him

I played my best for him.

Then he smiled at me

Me and my drum

When we take the steps of action.

Steps of faithfulness.

Steps of following Jesus in living our design,

We feel this, right?

This little drummer boy felt small. Insignificant. He didn’t have much to offer by the world’s standards, or even his own.

And yet, he offered what he could.

He played music for the King.

What was it like to play that first note?

To put the drumstick to the body of the drum.

Was he quiet at first?

Or did he beat it boldly?

Regardless, Jesus did what He does.

He saw him.

He smiled.

He delighted in him.

He encouraged by His response.

What a sweet reminder that God doesn’t expect grand gestures.

He simply wants us to live as we were designed to be.

To use the gifts He gave us for His glory—and our enjoyment.

To take small acts of obedience and faith.

To give back to Him out of the generosity of what has been given.

I am not a drummer.

You may not be either.

But I am confident the Lord has given you something.

Gifts.

Talents.

A story.

Many stories, perhaps.

And they are to be shared—with Jesus. With others. In a way that cultivates worship.

The little drummer boy—He did something that day.

Jesus noticed it—He smiled.

I have confidence that drummer boy fell more in love with His savior that day and walked in deeper obedience and alignment with His King because of one action step.

I also believe He encouraged others by His faith.

Who else noticed?

Who else was ministered to because He was faithful?

Who else saw this small boy and thought, Who is this King this drummer boy is playing for?

Why is He important?

Or maybe I can do something too.

I don’t have gold or silver, but I have ______.

Our gifts are not given to hoard or keep hidden—they are meant to be a magnificent way to glorify God.

To say,

He is great and beautiful and to be honored.

He made me.

He gave me this.

I am going to do this to bless Him.

Join me….

Do you know the baby in the manger?

I hope so.

If not, listen to the drummer boy. There is nobody greater to know.

There is nobody greater to honor.

There is nobody who loves us more.

This season, I hope you encounter the One the drummer boy sings of and plays for.

Perhaps He is inviting you to play for Him too.

Sincerely,

Crystal

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